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You are here:Home » Antibodies » Abs to Infectious Disease Enterovirus » Anti -Enterovirus 71

Anti -Enterovirus 71

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Specifications

Clone Host Grade Applications
Monoclonal Mouse Ascites IF
The enteroviruses are a genus of (+)ssRNA viruses associated with several human and mammalian diseases. Historically the most significant has been the Poliovirus. Other types are coxsackie and echovirus. Enterovirus are the most common cause of aseptic meningitis and can cause serious disease especially in infants and the immunocompromised.
"Human enteroviruses (family Picornaviridae) infect millions of people worldwide each year, resulting in a wide range of clinical outcomes ranging from unapparent infection to mild respiratory illness (common cold), hand, foot and mouth disease, acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis, aseptic meningitis, myocarditis, severe neonatal sepsis-like disease, and acute flaccid paralysis. In the United States, enteroviruses are responsible for 30,000 to 50,000 meningitis hospitalizations per year as a result of 30 million to 50 million infections. Serologic studies have distinguished 66 human enterovirus serotypes on the basis of an antibody neutralization test, and additional antigenic variants have been defined within several of the serotypes on the basis of reduced or nonreciprocal cross-neutralization between prototype and variant strains. On the basis of their pathogenesis in humans and experimental animals, the enteroviruses were originally classified into four groups, polioviruses, coxsackie A viruses (CA), coxsackie B viruses (CB), and echoviruses, but it was quickly realized that there were significant overlaps in the biological properties of viruses in the different groups. The more recently isolated enteroviruses have been named with a system of consecutive numbers: EV68, EV69, EV70, and EV71."[1] There "are 62 non-polio enteroviruses that can cause disease in humans: 23 Coxsackie A viruses, 6 Coxsackie B viruses, 28 echoviruses, and 5 other enteroviruses."[2]
Catalog #E3310-10
EV71 was first isolated and characterized from cases of neurological disease in California in 1969.[7][8] "Enterovirus 71 (EV71), the newest member of Enterovirudae, is notable for its etiological role in epidemics of severe neurological diseases in children. It appears to be emerging as an important virulent neurotropic enterovirus in the upcoming era of poliomyelitis eradication".[9] The illness usually peaks in June or July.
ApplicationsSuitable for use in Immunofluorescence. Other applications not tested.
Recommended DilutionIndirect Immunofluorescence: 1:500
Optimal dilutions to be determined by the researcher.
Storage and StabilityMay be stored at 4°C for short-term only. For long-term storage, aliquot and store at -20°C. Aliquots are stable for 12 months at -20°C. For maximum recovery of product, centrifuge the original vial after thawing and prior to removing the cap. Further dilutions can be made in assay buffer.
Clone TypeMonoclonal
IsotypeIgG1
Clone No2Q1930
HostMouse
ConcentrationNot determined
FormSupplied as a liquid in PBS, 40% glycerol.
PurityAscites
ImmunogenWhole viral lysate of Enterovirus 71
SpecificityRecognizes Enterovirus 71. Neutralizes enterovirus 71 BrCr strain at a titer of less than 1
Important NoteThis product as supplied is intended for research use only, not for use in human, therapeutic or diagnostic applications without the expressed written authorization of United States Biological.


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