Technical Data
029442
CDH5 (Cadherin-5, 7B4 Antigen, Vascular Endothelial Cadherin, VE-cadherin, CD144)
Description:
Human Vascular Endothelial (VE)-cadherin is a calcium-dependent adhesion molecule strictly located at cell-to-cell junctions. VE-cadherin is present in all types of endothelium (veins, arteries, capillary and large vessels). Cadherins are calcium dependent cell adhesion proteins. They preferentially interact with themselves in a homophilic manner in connecting cells. Cadherins may thus contribute to the sorting of heterogeneous cell types. VE-cadherin may play an important role in endothelial cell biology through control of the cohesion and organization of the intercellular junctions. VE-cadherin also associates with alpha-catenin forming a link to the cytoskeleton.

Applications:
Suitable for use in Flow Cytometry, Western Blot, Immunohistochemistry and Immunocytochemistry. Other applications not tested.

Recommended Dilution:
Western Blot: 1:2000
Immunohistochemistry (Formalin fixed paraffin embedded): 1:10-1:20
Immunocytochemistry: 1:500
Optimal dilutions to be determined by the researcher.

Positive Control:
HUVEC cell lysate

Storage and Stability:
May be stored at 4C for short-term only. Aliquot to avoid repeated freezing and thawing. Store at -20C. Aliquots are stable for at least 12 months. For maximum recovery of product, centrifuge the original vial after thawing and prior to removing the cap.
TypeIsotypeCloneGrade
MabIgG2a,k13A168Affinity Purified
SizeStorageShippingSourceHost
100ul-20CBlue IceHumanMouse
Concentration:
~0.5mg/ml
Immunogen:
HUVEC cells
Purity:
Purified by Protein G affinity chromatography.
Form
Supplied as a liquid in 0.1M Tris-Glycine, pH 7.4, 150mM sodium chloride, 0.05% sodium azide.
Specificity:
Recognizes human VE-Cadherin.
Intended for research use only. Not for use in human, therapeutic, or diagnostic applications.
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