Technical Data
E8949-01A
Eukaryotic Translation Initiation Factor 2, alpha (eIF2a)
Description:
EIF-2alpha, also known as eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2alpha, promotes the binding of the initiator tRNA to the 40S ribosomal subunits and controls translational rates via phosphorylation/dephosphorylation mechanisms. The double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-activated protein kinase (PKR) provides an important control in the regulation of protein synthesis initiation through the phosphorylation of eIF-2alpha. Phosphorylated eIF-2 alpha inhibits cell growth and induces apoptosis. Phosphorylation of eIF-2alpha occurs under a variety of conditions including viral infection, apoptosis, nutrient deprivation, heme-deprivation, and certain stresses. EIF-2 exists as a heterotrimeric protein composed of 3 nonidentical subunits, alpha (36kD), beta (38kD), and gamma (52kD).

Applications:
Suitable for use in Western Blot and Immunohistochemistry. Other applications not tested.

Recommended Dilution:
Western Blot: 1:1000
Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin): 1:50
Optimal dilutions to be determined by the researcher.

Storage and Stability:
May be stored at 4C for short-term only. For long-term storage, aliquot and store at -20C. Aliquots are stable for at least 12 months at -20C. For maximum recovery of product, centrifuge the original vial after thawing and prior to removing the cap. Further dilutions can be made in assay buffer.
TypeIsotypeCloneGrade
MabIgG2b7H20Ascites
SizeStorageShippingSourceHost
100ul4C (-20C Glycerol)Blue IceHumanMouse
Concentration:
Not Determined
Immunogen:
Purified recombinant human eIF2a
Purity:
Ascites
Form
Supplied as a liquid in 10mM sodium HEPES, pH 7.5, 150mM sodium chloride, 0.1mg/ml BSA, 0.02% sodium azide, 50% glycerol.
Specificity:
Recognizes endogenous levels of total human eIF2a protein. Species Crossreactivity: mouse, rat and monkey.
Intended for research use only. Not for use in human, therapeutic, or diagnostic applications.
1. Kimball, S.R. (1999) Int. J. Biochem. Cell Biol. 31:25-29. 2. De Haro, C. et al. (1996) FASEB J. 10:1378-1387. 3. Kaufman, R.J. (1999) Genes Dev. 13:1211-1233. 4. Sheikh, M.S. and Fornace Jr., A.J. (1999) Oncogene 18:6121-6128. 5. Cheshire, J.L. et al. (1999) J. Biol. Chem. 274:4801-4806. 6. Zamanian-Daryoush, M. et al. (2000) Mol. Cell. Biol. 20:1278-1290.