Technical Data
L9190-14C
Lysosome Associated Membrane Protein 2 (LAMP 2, CD107b, Igp2, Igp110) (PE)
Description:
CD107b, also known as lysosomal-associated membrane protein 2 (LAMP-2), is a heavily glycosylated, type I transmembrane protein that constitutes the major sialoglycoproteins on lysosomal membranes. It is a ligand for galaptin, an S-type lectin present in extracellular matrix, through its recognition of acetyllactosamine oligosaccharide chains, and is a ligand for E-selectin-mediated cell adhesion. CD107b is expressed by granulocytes, T cells, macrophages, dendritic cells, activated platelets tonsillar epithelium and some tumor cell lines, including U937 and KG1a. It is also a widely expressed intracellular antigen. LAMP-2 may function in protecting the inner surface of the lysosomal membrane by forming a barrier to lysosomal hydrolases. The upregulation of both CD107a and CD107b on the surface of tumor cell lines has been associated with their enhanced metastatic potential, where they may increase adhesion to extracellular matrix and endothelium.

Applications:
Suitable for use in Flow Cytometry and Immunohistochemistry. Other applications not tested.

Recommended Dilution:
Flow Cytometry: 10ul labels 10e6 cells.
Immunohistochemistry: Acetone-fixed, frozen tissue sections
Optimal dilutions to be determined by the researcher.

Storage and Stability:
May be stored at 4C before opening. DO NOT FREEZE! Stable at 4C as an undiluted liquid. Dilute only prior to immediate use. Freezing R-Phycoerythrin (PE) conjugates will result in a substantial loss of activity. PE conjugates are sensitive to light.
TypeIsotypeCloneGrade
MabIgG15K77Purified
SizeStorageShippingSourceHost
100Tests4C Do Not FreezeBlue IceHumanMouse
Concentration:
Not Determined
Immunogen:
Human LAMP-2.
Purity:
Purified
Form
Supplied as a liquid in PBS, 0.1% sodium azide and a stabilizing agent. Labeled with R-Phycoerythrin (PE).
Specificity:
Recognizes human CD107b/ LAMP 2.
Intended for research use only. Not for use in human, therapeutic, or diagnostic applications.
1. Schlossman, S., L. Bloumsell, W. Gilks, J.M. Harlan, C. Kishimoto, J. Ritz, S. Shaw, R. Silverstein, T. Springer, T.F. Tedder, and R.F. Todd, eds. 1995. Leukocyte V: White Cell Differentiation Antigens, Oxford University Press, Oxford 2. Barclay, A.N., M.H. Brown, S.K.A. Law, A.J. McKnight, M.G. Tomlinson, and P.A. van der Merwe, eds. 1997. The Leukocyte Antigens Facts Book, 2nd Edition, CD107a, 107b Section, Academic Press, New York, p. 389 3. Sawada, R., K.A. Jardine, and M. Fukuda. 1993. J. Biol. Chem. 268:9014 4. Febbraio, M., and R.L. Silverstein. 1990. J. Biol. Chem. 265:18531 5. Chen, J.W., Y. Cha, K.U. Yuksel, R.W. Gracy, and J.T. August. 1988. J. Biol. Chem. 263:8754 6. Sawada, R., J.B. Lowe, and M. Fukuda. 1993. J. Biol. Chem. 268:12675 7. Sawada, R., S. Tsuboi, and M. Fukuda. 1994. J. Biol. Chem. 269