Technical Data
W1018-52A
West Nile Virus, Matrix (West Nile Virus Matrix Protein, WNV Matrix Protein, Envelope Protein M, Matrix Protein, West Nile Virus Envelope Protein M)
Description:
West Nile Virus (WNV) is a member of the Flaviviridae, a plus-stranded virus family that includes St. Louis encephalitis virus, yellow fever virus, and Dengue virus. WNV was initially isolated in 1937 in the West Nile region of Uganda and has become prevalent in Africa, Asia, and Europe. It has rapidly spread across the United States with cases being observed in every continental state (reviewed in 1). Virus particles consist of a dense core made up of the core/capsid protein encapsulating the RNA genome surrounded by a membrane envelope embedded with envelope and matrix proteins (1). However, when the viruses are inside of infected cells, the matrix protein exists in its pre-M form as a heterodimer with the envelope proteins. Cleavage of the pre-M protein to its mature form occurs during release of the virus; this cleavage leas to the dissociation of the heterodimers (2). The WNV receptor has recently been identified as alpha v beta 3 integrin (3).

Applications:
Suitable for use in ELISA. Other applications not tested.

Recommended Dilution:
Optimal dilutions to be determined by the researcher.

Storage and Stability:
May be stored at 4C. For long-term storage, aliquot and store at 4C. Do not freeze. Aliquots are stable for 12 months. For maximum recovery of product, centrifuge the original vial prior to removing the cap. Further dilutions can be made in assay buffer.
TypeIsotypeCloneGrade
PabIgGPurified
SizeStorageShippingSourceHost
100ug4C Do Not FreezeBlue IceRabbit
Concentration:
As Reported
Immunogen:
Synthetic peptide corresponding to 15 amino acids near the middle of the WNV Matrix precursor (NP_776012).
Purity:
Purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation.
Form
Supplied as a liquid in PBS, 0.02% sodium azide.
Specificity:
Recognizes WNV Matrix.
Intended for research use only. Not for use in human, therapeutic, or diagnostic applications.
1. Gould LH and Fikrig E. West Nile virus: a growing concern? J. Clin. Invest. 2004; 113:1102-7. 2. Wengler G and Wengler G. Cell-associated West Nile flavivirus is covered with E+pre-M protein heterodimers which are destroyed and reorganized by proteolytic cleavage during virus release. J. Virol. 1989; 2521-6. 3. Chu JJ and Ng ML. Interaction of West Nile virus with alpha v beta 3 integrin mediates virus entry into cells. J. Biol. Chem. 2004; 279:54533-41.