Technical Data
E9085-02B
Ezh2 (Enhancer of Zeste Homolog 2, Polycomb group (PcG) Protein, ENX-1, EZH1, MGC9169)
Description:
The EZH2 gene is a homolog of the Drosophila Polycomb group (Pc-G) gene enhancer of zeste, which is a crucial regulator of homeotic gene expression during embryonic development. The human homolog EZH2 (also known as ENX1) was initially isolated in a search for proteins that interact with Vav, a human proto-oncogene product involved in lymphocyte development and activation. EZH2 controls B cell development through histone H3 methylation and the regulation of immunoglobulin heavy chain gene Igh rearrangement. EZH2 is ubiquitously expressed during early embryogenesis, and becomes restricted to the central and peripheral nervous systems and sites of fetal hematopoiesis during later development. In the adult, ENX-1 is restricted to the spleen, testis and placenta. The human EZH2 gene was originally mapped to chromosome 215, but further studies showed that this is a pseudogene, and that EZH2 actually maps to chromosome 7q35 within the critical region for malignant myeloid disorders. EZH2 and BMI-1 genes are co expressed in Reed-Sternberg cells of Hodgkin’s disease. Co expression of BMI-1 and EZH2 is also associated with cycling cells and degree of malignancy in B-cell non-Hogkin’s lymphoma. EZH2 is involved in the progression of prostate cancer, and is also a marker that distinguishes prostate cancers at risk of lethal progression from indolent prostate cancer. The discovery that the transcriptional repressor EZH2 is turned on in prostate tumors as they became metastatic, leading to the silencing of many genes, suggests a new mechanism for tumor progression. EZH2 has also recently been identified as a marker of aggressive breast cancer and a promoter of neoplastic transformation of breast epithelial cells.

Applications:
Suitable for use in ELISA, Western Blot and Immunohistochemistry. Other applications have not been tested.

Recommended Dilution:
ELISA: 0.1-1ug/ml
Western Blot: 0.5-2ug/ml. Bands at ~100kD and ~125kD
Immunohistochemistry (Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded): 2ug/ml. Heat induced epitope retrieval (HIER) with citrate buffer, pH 6.0, is required prior to staining.
Optimal dilutions to be determined by the researcher.

Storage and Stability:
May be stored at 4°C for short-term only. Aliquot to avoid repeated freezing and thawing. Store at -20°C. Aliquots are stable for at least 12 months. For maximum recovery of product, centrifuge the original vial after thawing and prior to removing the cap.
TypeIsotypeCloneGrade
PabIgGAffinity Purified
SizeStorageShippingSourceHost
50ug-20°CBlue IceHumanRabbit
Concentration:
~0.25mg/ml
Immunogen:
Synthetic peptide corresponding to the internal region of the human EZH2 (ENX1) protein.
Purity:
Purified by immunoaffinity chromatography.
Form
Supplied as a liquid in PBS, pH 7.4, 0.1% sodium azide.
Specificity:
Recognizes the human EZH2 protein. Reactivity has been confirmed with human Jurkat T cell leukemia, PC-3 prostate adenocarcinoma, BC-1 B cell lymphoma, Nalm-6 pre-B lymphocyte and HeLa cervical adenocarcinoma cell lysates by Western Blot and with formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) human breast cancer, lymphoma, and normal prostate, esophagus, pancreas, stomach, liver, and brain tissues by immunohistochemistry. Species sequence homology: mouse
Intended for research use only. Not for use in human, therapeutic, or diagnostic applications.
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