Technical Data
N2060-05A
Nestin (ESTM46, FLJ21841, Intermediate Filament Protein, Nbla00170, Nes)
Description:
Nestin is a class VI intermediate filament protein that is expressed in stem cells of the central nervous system (CNS) but not in mature CNS cells. Nestin expression is used extensively as a marker for CNS stem cells in the developing nervous system and in vitro cultured cells. Its transient expression is a critical step in the neural differentiation pathway. Nestin is also expressed in non-neural stem cell populations, such as pancreatic islet progenitors and hematopoietic progenitors.

Applications:
Suitable for use in Flow Cytometry and Immunocytochemistry. Other applications not tested.

Recommended Dilutions:
Flow Cytometry: 2.5ug labels 10e6 cells for intracellular staining. Validated using A172 human glioblastoma cell line fixed with parafomaldehyde and permeabilized with saponin.
Immunocytochemistry: 8-25ug/ml. Validated using immersion fixed human neural progenitor cells.
Optimal dilutions to be determined by the researcher.

Storage and Stability:
Lyophilized powder may be stored at -20C. Stable for 12 months after receipt at -20C. Reconstitute with sterile PBS. Aliquot to avoid repeated freezing and thawing. Store at -20C. Reconstituted product is stable for 12 months at -20C. For maximum recovery of product, centrifuge the original vial after thawing and prior to removing the cap. Further dilutions can be made in assay buffer.
TypeIsotypeCloneGrade
MabIgG13k1Affinity Purified
SizeStorageShippingSourceHost
100ug-20CBlue IceHumanMouse
Concentration:
~0.5mg/ml (after reconstitution)
Immunogen:
NSO cells transfected with human Nestin.
Purity:
Purified by Protein G affinity chromatography.
Form
Supplied as a lyophilized powder from PBS, pH 7.4, 5% trehalose. Reconstitute with 200ul sterile PBS.
Specificity:
Recognizes human Nestin.
Intended for research use only. Not for use in human, therapeutic, or diagnostic applications.
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